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Southern Cooking

I have some questions.

Can the sausage in sausage gravy be made into patties or is it always crumbled?

Is the gravy a bechamel?

Are biscuits similar to scones in texture?

Is the coating in chicken fried steak just like the Colonel’s 11 herbs and spices in terms of flavour, or is it more plan like a schnitzel?

by Anonymousreply 179July 9, 2024 10:32 AM

My grandmother cooked pork sausage patties, then made cream gravy with the pan drippings.

Biscuits are lighter than scones.

by Anonymousreply 1April 5, 2024 6:52 PM

Is it typically a mild pork sausage r1? Like a plain breakfast sausage?

In Australia, we don’t see bulk sausage per se, other than in McDonalds, it’s all in links. So if I were to make it I would have to buy my own pork mince and season it.

by Anonymousreply 2April 5, 2024 6:55 PM

[quote]Can the sausage in sausage gravy be made into patties or is it always crumbled? Is the gravy a bechamel?

Generally, sausage gravy is intended to be poured over biscuits or served in a bowl which you can take a biscuit and scoop the gravy out. So the sausage should be crumbled. It’s very much like a bechamel: slowly thickening milk with flour and drippings and adding sausage crumbles.

[quote]Are biscuits similar to scones in texture?

No, biscuits are lighter, less dense, more flaky, and sometimes have layers. Outside of the US I’ve not found bread that is like it.

[quote]Is the coating in chicken fried steak just like the Colonel’s 11 herbs and spices in terms of flavour, or is it more plan like a schnitzel?

The coating is whatever you want it to be. It’s mainly flour, egg and whatever spices you like: so it can be mild with black pepper, cayenne, red pepper flakes or you can add hot sauce and make it spicy.

by Anonymousreply 3April 5, 2024 7:11 PM

You’re being trolled by the Op…just so ya know.

by Anonymousreply 4April 5, 2024 7:13 PM

[quote]You’re being trolled by the Op…just so ya know.

There were probably three other people who had these same questions but were too shy to raise their hands.

by Anonymousreply 5April 5, 2024 8:03 PM

MMMMM salty pan drippings over white flour hockey pucks. Nourishment fit for a health nut.

by Anonymousreply 6April 5, 2024 10:47 PM

Watch this!

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by Anonymousreply 7April 5, 2024 10:51 PM

Op please check out southern-frugal channel on YouTube Phyllis Stokes (RIP) has tons of cheap-ass home style how to videos.

by Anonymousreply 8April 5, 2024 11:01 PM

[quote] You’re being trolled by the Op…just so ya know.

That’s not true r4.

by Anonymousreply 9April 6, 2024 12:40 AM

[quote] Op please check out southern-frugal channel on YouTube Phyllis Stokes (RIP) has tons of cheap-ass home style how to videos.

Phyllis Stokes husband (also dead) wore a MAGA hat in one of her videos. I also saw her being rude to a black salesperson (young woman) in Walmart. She was always referring to her husband as "Mr. ___" and herself as "Miss Phyllis" or whatever -- i.e., with terms of respect.

But in Walmart, she looked at the young black woman salesperson and said: "HEY!" to get her attention and then ask her some dumb question about a product on the shelf.

RUDE.

by Anonymousreply 10April 6, 2024 6:29 AM

Can you explain this can of Heinz Beans obsession y'all have, OP?

by Anonymousreply 11April 6, 2024 6:34 AM

You’d have to ask someone who’s English and not Australian r11.

by Anonymousreply 12April 6, 2024 9:44 AM

Ok then, why did you steal our corn fritters for your famous Aussie brunch?

by Anonymousreply 13April 6, 2024 9:53 AM

Paula Deen, politics aside, on youtube.

by Anonymousreply 14April 6, 2024 9:56 AM

Do you have your local stroke unit on speed dial, OP?

by Anonymousreply 15April 6, 2024 10:03 AM

Why the Vegemite, OP?

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by Anonymousreply 16April 6, 2024 12:25 PM

[quote]She was always referring to her husband as "Mr. ___" and herself as "Miss Phyllis" or whatever

Older Southern people used to do that. Remember on The Waltons, Corabeth always saying “Mr. Godsey?” Women did that type of thing years ago.

by Anonymousreply 17April 6, 2024 12:31 PM

[quote] Ok then, why did you steal our corn fritters for your famous Aussie brunch?

Because they taste good.

by Anonymousreply 18April 6, 2024 4:28 PM

Don't they eat cats in Australia? They're slaughtering them wholesale, they should eat them.

by Anonymousreply 19April 6, 2024 5:08 PM

Wouldn’t southern cooking be northern for you, OP?

by Anonymousreply 20April 6, 2024 5:43 PM

They eat 'roos and we eat 'possums!

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by Anonymousreply 21April 6, 2024 6:07 PM

Northern-southern cuisine

by Anonymousreply 22April 6, 2024 6:14 PM

A lot of Americans don't know how to make biscuits and have never had or made biscuits with sausage gravy. They may have had those awful Pillsbury biscuits things in a can or the slightly better frozen Mason Dixie biscuits or bakery biscuits or ordered them at restaurants with fried chicken or jam.

For some of us, gravy made with pork drippings is a bridge too far. Same folks have never had chicken fried steak because why?.

by Anonymousreply 23April 6, 2024 6:15 PM

sr flour, oil, liquid = biscuits

by Anonymousreply 24April 6, 2024 6:21 PM

There are Southern foods that are universally popular such as chicken and waffles or grits and shrimp. Also there are multiple varieties of Southern food--low country fish boils, Gullah Geechee cuisine, soul food, creole--and regional specialties like Brunswick stew and Kentucky burgoo..

Maybe someone can attach a menu with Southern foods that are popular coast to coast.

Most non-Southerners view this multi-faceted cuisine as a guilty pleasure and comfort food.

by Anonymousreply 25April 6, 2024 6:25 PM

The frozen biscuits that you cook are better than homemade, it's like pie crust, everyone has THE recipe but pie crust is either good or bad, and Marie Callanders is the best there is, fuck the vodka etc..

by Anonymousreply 26April 6, 2024 6:26 PM

Like the vodka in your coherent glass at this moment???

by Anonymousreply 27April 6, 2024 6:31 PM

This is a pretty good representation of Southern cuisine, with the exception of dill pickles, which are German and Jewish deli fare.

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by Anonymousreply 28April 6, 2024 6:39 PM

Good thing most of us aren’t from the South, and we aren’t faced with so many poor choices. We got our own issues…

by Anonymousreply 29April 6, 2024 6:45 PM

!n easier way to do biscuits is just make Butterswim Biscuits.

by Anonymousreply 30April 6, 2024 6:45 PM

Sorry "we got" that, sweetie.

by Anonymousreply 31April 6, 2024 6:50 PM

Hey r10 smell my asshole!

by Anonymousreply 32April 6, 2024 6:55 PM

R31 dumb

by Anonymousreply 33April 6, 2024 7:04 PM

[quote] In Australia, we don’t see bulk sausage per se, other than in McDonalds, it’s all in links

Just remove the meat from the casing.

by Anonymousreply 34April 6, 2024 7:05 PM

[quote]For some of us, gravy made with pork drippings is a bridge too far.

Hush your mouth. Them’s good eatin’.

by Anonymousreply 35April 6, 2024 7:41 PM

r25 says "Most non-Southerners view this multi-faceted cuisine as a guilty pleasure and comfort food". Bullshit. Northern Californian here, where most of us view most Southern Food - yes, and I'm including you too, Louisianna, with your muddy, lead and mercury-poisoned bottom feeder cesspool Gumbo - as trash food. It's the ultimate for those who love cardiovascular disease. What's wrong with fresh fruits and non-fried vegetables? "Multi-faceted cuisine"? My ass. Grease, salt, starch. A limited flavor spectrum, with low nutritional value.

That said, right now I would kill for a plate of baked (not fried) catfish, collard greens, blackeyed peas, and cornbread made without a cup of sugar. There are some elements and basic ingredients in Southern Cooking that are wonderful.

Meanwhile, the kids in that video are stranded on the island of the UK. Of course they like "Southern Food". They don't know any better. Pity that.

by Anonymousreply 36April 6, 2024 7:50 PM

You can make a similar gravy by using tiny pebbles that have just the right amount of dirt still on them, mixed with a little bit of rain water, for the desired thickness. .. My cousin prefers the spicier version I once made from asphalt grit found along the roadside. .. And start your diet today by dispensing with the biscuits altogether!

by Anonymousreply 37April 6, 2024 7:55 PM

[quote] Northern Californian here, where most of us view most Southern Food - yes, and I'm including you too, Louisianna, with your muddy, lead and mercury-poisoned bottom feeder cesspool Gumbo - as trash food.

I've lived in San Francisco and I dispute that most northern Californians view southern food, esp. Louisiana food, as trash.

I've never heard of southern food being stereotyped as trash. New Orleans / Louisiana food is actually well-respected.

by Anonymousreply 38April 6, 2024 7:57 PM

[quote] For some of us, gravy made with pork drippings is a bridge too far.

Why? Gravy is just some some type of fat, some type of thickener, and some broth / water.

by Anonymousreply 39April 6, 2024 7:58 PM

R36 sounds fun.

by Anonymousreply 40April 6, 2024 8:15 PM

A guilty pleasure is a once-in-a-while thing. Yes, it is possible to make healthy soul food or vegan soul food and many do. Nothing wrong with that. If you stringently adhere to a healthy diet, traditionaSouthern cooking is probably not your cuisine.

The reason I've never heard it referred to as trash food is that the term denigrates a region of the country and enslaved people, who were responsible for the diversity of Southern food and agriculture.

by Anonymousreply 41April 6, 2024 8:23 PM

Fukushima means nothing, r49.

by Anonymousreply 42April 6, 2024 8:24 PM

R38 funny that, considering that an overwhelming percentage of the Black population in the Bay Area migrated from Louisiana and southeastern Texas.

by Anonymousreply 43April 6, 2024 8:42 PM

For R36^ …oy

by Anonymousreply 44April 6, 2024 8:42 PM

Let's call in some impartial judges.

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by Anonymousreply 45April 6, 2024 9:27 PM

And desserts

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by Anonymousreply 46April 6, 2024 9:28 PM

Soul food tasting.

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by Anonymousreply 47April 6, 2024 9:36 PM

Part of those Foreign People Eat American food videos is that I wonder who is doing the cooking and what recipes they’re using.

Biscuits can be great or bad depending on several factors. Same with fried chicken. Those two things you can mess up if you don’t know what you’re doing.

by Anonymousreply 48April 6, 2024 9:37 PM

Very true R48. I know cream gravy is like flavorless paste unless a home cook is making it.

by Anonymousreply 49April 6, 2024 9:39 PM

And from " Halmoni" ( grandmother)

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by Anonymousreply 50April 6, 2024 9:39 PM

Some people love it - but I've never understood the appeal. Particularly for breakfast. Two heavy biscuits with pork gravy - it's just fat and grease.

I've never had it and had more than 1 bite - and I think I've sampled enough.

Grits is also flavorless and a no-starter for me.

But there is a ton of great tasting Southern food - I love collard greens, cornbread, butter beans, black eyed peas, etc. Just not a fan of the breakfast offerings.

by Anonymousreply 51April 7, 2024 1:43 AM

R36 was repulsive even before her hip bone cut through the skin.

by Anonymousreply 52April 7, 2024 1:52 AM

[quote]Grits is also flavorless and a no-starter for me.

I know you’re not a “fat and greasy” type of gal, but grits are best with a mix-in: butter, cheese or bacon. Or all three if you’re feeling fiesty.

by Anonymousreply 53April 7, 2024 2:04 AM

Polenta is much better.

;)

by Anonymousreply 54April 7, 2024 2:07 AM

Iowa’s famous plate sized pork tenderloin is like schnitzel. Light crumb like coating. Southern chicken fried steak is more dipped, breaded and seasoned. I pound the seasoned flour into chicken fried steak first, and no egg in the dip. Makes it stick to the pan when frying. My dad ruined every chicken fried steak dinner we had by cursing the crust sticking to the pan.

by Anonymousreply 55April 7, 2024 2:28 AM

Grits, polenta, whatever you call it ... It's a texture thing for me. I just don't like that texture. Same with applesauce and rice pudding. I don't like that texture.

by Anonymousreply 56April 7, 2024 3:42 AM

Have you thought to “ask a real southern witch”? Unfortunately her original thread from like a decade ago seems to have been deleted, but it looks like there’ve been subsequent compliments.

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by Anonymousreply 57April 7, 2024 3:54 AM

Also, my beloved, Paula Deen has a fabulous YouTube channel where you can probably find the answer to this and innumerable other Southern cooking quandaries.

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by Anonymousreply 58April 7, 2024 3:57 AM

[quote]Just remove the meat from the casing.

American sausages must be a higher provenance than the standard Australian sausage (which is basically a British sausage, and see the famous Yes Minister episode for their contents). I wouldn’t dream of removing sausage meat from the casing and frying it. Here’s it’s mostly finely ground fat, gristle and grain. The “gourmet” and ethnic sausage links are better, but you’re still likely to come across a big clump of cartilage.

What are the standard spices in American sausage? I’m guessing white pepper, maybe nutmeg and sage and onion powder? Americans seem to make good use of onion powder and garlic granules.

by Anonymousreply 59April 7, 2024 11:11 AM

OP -- if you have TikTok, try "Mississippi_Kween" She has some how-to recipes.

by Anonymousreply 60April 7, 2024 11:34 AM

I’ll check her r60.

I watched Kenji’s video on YouTube and wasn’t impressed due to the lack of buttermilk in his biscuits. When I think Americana, I think buttermilk.

America’s Test Kitchen has a recipe.

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by Anonymousreply 61April 7, 2024 3:14 PM

R61 -- that's a Yankee biscuit. ATK broadcasts from Boston. Those pinheads don't know diddly-squat about Southern biscuits.

by Anonymousreply 62April 7, 2024 3:28 PM

Southern Witch was D-vida aka Poo if I recall. She wouldn't know shit about southern cooking.

by Anonymousreply 63April 7, 2024 3:36 PM

R62 Miss Scarlett I do declare.

by Anonymousreply 64April 7, 2024 3:42 PM

R62 Does this recipe for sausage gravy from the “dirty south” meet your approval?

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by Anonymousreply 65April 7, 2024 5:37 PM

r62, go die in a pork fat grease fire.

by Anonymousreply 66April 7, 2024 5:44 PM

Fuck you and try this, Yankee bastard @ r66:

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by Anonymousreply 67April 7, 2024 6:11 PM

My parents make drop biscuits, which are great hot but I hate them after they've gone cool. At least premade biscuits stay palatable even when cooled off. McDonalds has a great flaky biscuit I'd love to duplicate at home.

R10 - I was a huge fan of Ms. Phyllis and Mr. Bucky -- watched them for years. I never knew he wore a MAGA hat. Yikes.

by Anonymousreply 68April 7, 2024 6:37 PM

I tried Kenji's stovetop macaroni and cheese recipe and was disappointed. Sad because he speaks with such authority.

I tried Kenji's method of boiled / steamed eggs, though, and it worked (easy to peel, for the most part).

I noticed that he put out another video on macaroni and cheese. Maybe I'll watch it, just to see what he did differently from the recipe / video I followed (to a T!).

R68, yes, I'm the one who posted about Mr. Bucky & his dumb MAGA hat. That whole plan to move into a mobile home was ill-conceived. Bucky couldn't even drive due to a bad foot or bad leg. Phyllis was never comfortable with driving that huge thing they bought. She spent a ton of time decorating the interior and they took maybe one trip in it.

by Anonymousreply 69April 7, 2024 6:42 PM

Good recipe for gristle-free breakfast sausage. If you don't have a grinder, a grinder attachment for your mixer or a food processor, ask your butcher to grind the meat.

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by Anonymousreply 70April 7, 2024 7:46 PM

@ r67, mmmm... that looks good... fuck you for making me hungry, you filthy Southern queen.

by Anonymousreply 71April 7, 2024 8:32 PM

[quote]OP/R59: What are the standard spices in American sausage? I’m guessing white pepper, maybe nutmeg and sage and onion powder? Americans seem to make good use of onion powder and garlic granules.

I prefer this spice balance to Alton Brown's at R70.

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by Anonymousreply 72April 7, 2024 11:35 PM

A good spice to put in sausage is anise seed. I hate the taste of licorice candy, but the anise seed works well in savory things like sausage.

by Anonymousreply 73April 8, 2024 12:17 AM

Eggs and grits. I like grits too. How do you cook your grits? You like 'em regular, creamy, or al dente?

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by Anonymousreply 74April 8, 2024 6:26 AM

R45, I call foul on the grits because apparently there was no butter and the grits must have been undercooked and under-salted. They should not be watery or taste like baby food, and they should have a pool of melting butter in the middle. Maybe they used those awful instant grits.

R59, we have many kinds of sausage in America. Some have a more finely ground, dense texture, like hot dogs or bratwurst (or, I think bangers, if that’s what you mean by British sausage). You can’t remove those from the casing, and even if you could, you’d just have a solid blob of sausage. The kind that’s used for sausage gravy or sausage patties is more like Italian sausage. it's coarsely ground and looser in texture, so you can easily break it up, The flavor is different from Italian sausage because it doesn’t have Italian herbs; it’s usually very peppery and spicy. (Not hot-spicy; savory-spicy.)

by Anonymousreply 75April 8, 2024 7:03 AM

The r72 spice mix looks great but isn’t it basically an Italian sausage mix, rather than a country sausage or “breakfast” sausage?

by Anonymousreply 76April 8, 2024 9:28 AM

Who is eating sausage with gristle in it? I don't think I've ever noticed gristle.

by Anonymousreply 77April 8, 2024 1:27 PM

I love grits. Bland, like rice, so perfect for making savory or sweet. For breakfast. Some butter, a bit of sugar and cinnamon. Dinner, shrimp and cheese.

by Anonymousreply 78April 8, 2024 1:29 PM

Penzeys makes several spice blends for sausages:

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by Anonymousreply 79April 8, 2024 1:30 PM

[quote] Who is eating sausage with gristle in it? I don't think I've ever noticed gristle.

Sausages here (Australia) are made from offcuts, not nice pieces of chuck or shoulder.

by Anonymousreply 80April 8, 2024 2:19 PM

I didn’t know that Southern style mac and cheese contains eggs, like a quiche, instead of a roux.

by Anonymousreply 81April 8, 2024 2:22 PM

Polenta!

by Anonymousreply 82April 8, 2024 3:05 PM

I didn't either R81.

by Anonymousreply 83April 8, 2024 3:08 PM

It doesn't in true Southern households, R81. That's probably some ol' Yankee macaroni and cheese gunk. Or maybe Cincinnati - they fuck up a lot of Southern recipes.

by Anonymousreply 84April 8, 2024 3:18 PM

The fuck up all good food in Cincy…

by Anonymousreply 85April 8, 2024 3:38 PM

I first heard of egg-in-mac-and-cheese on a Trisha Yearwood recipe she cooked on The View.

Then on r28’s link, the second recipe down.

by Anonymousreply 86April 8, 2024 4:16 PM

They have gristle in the sausage in Australia?!!! For God's sake, can't stupid British adjacent people do anything right? It probably is a mix of jellied eels and pork.

by Anonymousreply 87April 8, 2024 4:48 PM

R78, I can only eat it savory nowadays; as a child, my mother would always make grits for breakfast with milk, sugar and butter. Can’t eat it like that anymore. Cheese, scrambled eggs or shrimp and grits with bacon. Don’t talk to me otherwise.

by Anonymousreply 88April 8, 2024 4:51 PM

[quote]R76: The [R72] spice mix looks great but isn’t it basically an Italian sausage mix, rather than a country sausage or “breakfast” sausage?

No, an Italian sausage spice mix would include garlic and onion powders, basil, rosemary, and/or oregano. A breakfast sausage would simply have sage, thyme, and black pepper (my link calls for fennel seed, but I would go really light on that; in my spice cabinet, I keep ground fennel seed, so one can better control how one uses it, instead of encountering a sudden burst of fennel flavor from a fragment of the seed). Back in the late 1980s, I went for three or four years avoiding pork, so I did a lot of experimenting, making ground beef taste like sausage.

[quote]R77: Who is eating sausage with gristle in it? I don't think I've ever noticed gristle.

A chance encounter with gristle or tiny bone fragment is possible with any form of ground meat, no matter where it's from. It's just one of those risks. It's not supposed to be frequent (unless one is dealing with Stouffer's products 🤮), but it can still happen.

by Anonymousreply 89April 8, 2024 8:07 PM

This thread makes me crave boudin sausage.

by Anonymousreply 90April 8, 2024 8:10 PM

Make your own sausage and hand trim your meat or get the butcher to do it. I've only encountered gristle in a sausage served by a cheap-ass friend. My partner got sick twice after eating there and now declines invitations for meal.

by Anonymousreply 91April 8, 2024 8:31 PM

Some do eggs and some do not.

by Anonymousreply 92April 8, 2024 9:25 PM

Almost nobody makes their own fucking sausage, except a few rednecks making DEER sausage around here, I would vomit on it, do you slaughter your own hogs too?

by Anonymousreply 93April 8, 2024 10:13 PM

So it’s okay to buy sausage, but it’s not okay to make sausage? It’s okay to eat pork, but not okay to eat deer meat? It’s okay to eat pork that someone else has slaughtered for you, but it’s not okay to slaughter a pig, yourself?

by Anonymousreply 94April 8, 2024 10:25 PM

My mother sometimes has deer sausage because her husband hunts but not often anymore. It has to mixed with pork though as venison is too lean. If they didn't say it was venison you'd never know.

by Anonymousreply 95April 8, 2024 10:38 PM

I can smell deer meat in something, it's really rich and distinctive.

by Anonymousreply 96April 8, 2024 11:01 PM

R59, interesting! I have never thought to ask Australian friends, but British friends have occasionally commented on how they find American sausage much more meaty and flavorful.

The other thing British people seem to praise in the States is ice cream. Evidently American ice cream is a luxury thing in the UK.

by Anonymousreply 97April 8, 2024 11:05 PM

[quote]R93: Almost nobody makes their own fucking sausage, except a few rednecks making DEER sausage around here, I would vomit on it, do you slaughter your own hogs too?

The question arose because OP/R2 had stated that American-style breakfast sausage was unavailable in Australia, save the patties sold at McDonalds. Hence suggestions on how to make it and properly spice it.

by Anonymousreply 98April 8, 2024 11:09 PM

You buy ground pork, chicken or turkey. You put it in the food processor with seasonings. You whirr it a few times. Then shape into patties. Voila, breakfast sausage. Same routine with different seasonings for loose Italian sausage in meat sauces, pizza and lasagna.

I'm not suggesting anyone use a sausage stuffer and make brats or kielbasa or smoked Italian sausage.. But loose, non-smoked sausage is easy to make.

You can make your own Mexican chorizo with ground chicken. We learned how to do it during the pandemic.

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by Anonymousreply 99April 8, 2024 11:29 PM

[quote]R99: We learned how to do it during the pandemic.

Who's "we," R99?

by Anonymousreply 100April 8, 2024 11:34 PM

My partner and I. It was a joint project. It's better with ground pork but the chicken was pretty good.

They sell spice mixes if you don't have a bunch of spices. We used this.

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by Anonymousreply 101April 8, 2024 11:40 PM

obviously not you, r100.

by Anonymousreply 102April 9, 2024 12:01 AM

[quote]R102: obviously not you, [R100].

That reply didn't get any cuter than when your sock used it on the 𝐊𝐲𝐥𝐞 𝐑𝐢𝐭𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐬𝐞 𝐃𝐢𝐝 𝐒𝐨 𝐏𝐨𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐧 𝐔𝐒𝐌𝐂 𝐄𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐞 𝐄𝐱𝐚𝐦 𝐓𝐡𝐚𝐭 𝐇𝐞’𝐬 ‘𝐏𝐄𝐑𝐌𝐀𝐍𝐄𝐍𝐓𝐋𝐘’ 𝐁𝐚𝐧𝐧𝐞𝐝 𝐅𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐀𝐩𝐩𝐥𝐲𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐀𝐠𝐚𝐢𝐧 thread, at Reply 78.

It was a straightforward question at R100, and R101 gave a satisfactory straightforward answer.

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by Anonymousreply 103April 9, 2024 12:10 AM

R101 but that’s not chorizo —which, by definition, is pork.

by Anonymousreply 104April 9, 2024 12:20 AM

Then what's this, R104?

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by Anonymousreply 105April 9, 2024 12:24 AM

Back when I was a cashier, we had pork roasts on sale (pork shoulders?). A man came buying a boatload as well as some spices. He and his brothers got together once a year to make pork sausage.

by Anonymousreply 106April 9, 2024 12:47 AM

That’s not authentic chorizo, that’s what.

by Anonymousreply 107April 9, 2024 2:08 AM

This thread is making me HUNGRY AS HELL

by Anonymousreply 108April 9, 2024 4:37 AM

R88, I like to put in lots of sharp Cheddar, then mix in a beaten egg – temper the egg first with a little of the grits - and bake it until the top browns a bit. Delicious! It’s very rich (did I mention there’s also a lot of butter?), and it’s hard not to eat too much.

by Anonymousreply 109April 9, 2024 9:16 AM

[quote]Almost nobody makes their own fucking sausage, except a few rednecks making DEER sausage around here, I would vomit on it, do you slaughter your own hogs too?

I'll bet that, in addition to making great sausage, "rednecks" realize the importance of proper punctuation.

by Anonymousreply 110April 9, 2024 11:18 AM

R109 I like the way that sounds…must try that, thanks.

by Anonymousreply 111April 9, 2024 2:01 PM

One of my first jobs was as a cashier and a guy would come in when brisket was on sales and buy 5 or 6. He ground it up and freeze it. He said it made great burgers.

by Anonymousreply 112April 9, 2024 2:03 PM

Eek R112 here. Should be he "froze it" before the Oh Dear troll shows up.

by Anonymousreply 113April 9, 2024 2:11 PM

Just to be sure that after this long the questions have been answered:

Can the sausage in sausage gravy be made into patties or is it always crumbled?

No. Crumbled "breakfast" pork sausage only.

Is the gravy a bechamel?

Yes, but with the sausage stirred in (after it's cooked and drained and, for a lighter consistency, after the gravy is just about done) before serving, so it's really a béchamel (with milk) meat sauce. Adding a good amount of black pepper and some powdered sage gets it to the usual flavor.

Are biscuits similar to scones in texture?

American biscuits take several forms (drop or cut being the most common variants), but they are not quite scone-like in texture. The best biscuits can be separated, top and bottom, not broken into pieces like most scones.

Is the coating in chicken fried steak just like the Colonel’s 11 herbs and spices in terms of flavour, or is it more plan like a schnitzel?

Various approaches are used, but the standard is making sure the coating has good coverage and a fair amount of salt and black pepper. I use some ground cayenne pepper for a little more kick, and cut back on the black pepper. Onion powder, garlic powder, white pepper, and paprika (for color) are used, too, by some, along with various herbs, but the more constructed the flavors the less it's "chicken-fried steak," no matter what Texans say as they add cumin seed. Also, be aware that chicken-fried steak is deep-fried, and country-fried steak is pan fried. Use top round, eye of round or sirloin, and tenderize with a kitchen mallet. "Cube steak" has become too general in what kind of beef is used - if it's top round that's been "cubed" it's okay.

And the same gravy as with sausage and gravy can be made from the pan drippings - not too much grease, please.

by Anonymousreply 114April 9, 2024 2:57 PM

My dad invited himself to the home of an Italian colleague who made salami once a year. He paid for the meat. We hung them in our garage, they tasted so good.

Deer is a such lean meat. I enjoy the taste but I imagine it would need to be supplemented with a fat?

I have tried kangaroo sausages here, and they are extremely low in fat. They are also ground extremely fine, almost to a mush.

by Anonymousreply 115April 9, 2024 3:19 PM

When I make biscuits, I always sing this. Somehow they just taste better.

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by Anonymousreply 116April 9, 2024 3:40 PM

R115, the addition of fat to sausage is standard for most popular preparations. Pork fat is the usual fat added to venison salami, with back fat much preferred over belly fat. Some people make the mistake of using deer fat, but that is waxy and sometimes has a strong taste. For the leanness of venison I'd add just over 20% fat.

by Anonymousreply 117April 9, 2024 4:35 PM

Is southern cooking the same as soul food? What differences are there?

by Anonymousreply 118April 9, 2024 4:38 PM

Soul food uses less expensive ingredients r118.

by Anonymousreply 119April 9, 2024 5:12 PM

[quote]Is southern cooking the same as soul food? What differences are there?

They're more like cousins. They have some similarities and differences. Not all southern cooking is soul food and not all soul food is southern cooking.

by Anonymousreply 120April 9, 2024 5:16 PM

I read that years fried chicken was more of an after-church food, a treat, and not something people ate daily.

by Anonymousreply 121April 9, 2024 5:39 PM

[quote]I read that years fried chicken was more of an after-church food, a treat, and not something people ate daily.

Fried chicken was definitely a Sunday food, but it wasn't just for Sunday. In the South, chicken was cheap and eaten much more than beef.

by Anonymousreply 122April 9, 2024 5:48 PM

I love “American cheese”. The stuff that’s halfway between a Kraft Single and ordinary Tasty cheese.

I bought some Kirkland Signature Sharp Cheddar Cheese. It melts so much better than traditional crumbly cheddars.

I shall report back.

by Anonymousreply 123April 10, 2024 10:21 AM

[quote] some JOLLY American classic comfort food!

Not for most of us. This is Y’all Chow.

by Anonymousreply 124April 10, 2024 10:26 AM

[quote]In the South, chicken was cheap and eaten much more than beef.

A little anecdote about chicken: the girls of the infamous Chicken Ranch made famous in the Best Little Whorehouse in Texas fame took chickens as payment during the Depression.

I spent a weekend at a Hill Coutnry cabin that was furnished with the bed of the Madam.

by Anonymousreply 125April 10, 2024 10:45 AM

[quote]Almost nobody makes their own fucking sausage, except a few rednecks making DEER sausage around here, I would vomit on it, do you slaughter your own hogs too?

It's not complicated you lazy queen. You can buy ground pork at almost any grocery store, mix in your choice of spices, form into a patty. Done.

You sound like the same guy on another thread who would only by pre-chopped onions because it was so difficult to chop one onion for a recipe.

by Anonymousreply 126April 10, 2024 11:18 AM

All you need is sodium citrate to make cheese melt like American cheese and protect yourself from other additives. Video explainer at link.

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by Anonymousreply 127April 10, 2024 12:59 PM

[quote]R107: That’s not authentic chorizo, that’s what.

Sez you.

[quote]Chorizo is a type of sausage that originated in Spain and Portugal and is usually made from pork or beef.

[quote]Spanish chorizo is commonly made from pork and occasionally beef.

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by Anonymousreply 128April 10, 2024 3:49 PM

No one claimed that chicken or turkey chorizo is authentic, just more healthful.

by Anonymousreply 129April 10, 2024 4:14 PM

You stupid fucking cunt, nobody said making fucking sausage is hard, NOBODY is going to make their own sausage, NOBODY but a butt cunt like you.

by Anonymousreply 130April 10, 2024 4:47 PM

Does the anonymity of DL attract an inordinate quantity of people with anger management issues? I think yes.

by Anonymousreply 131April 10, 2024 6:02 PM

How did Miss Joanie mispronounce "sausages" in that grocery store video (the one with the red Weirdo)?

by Anonymousreply 132April 10, 2024 6:14 PM

OP = Mr. Richard Fader from Fort Lee, New Jersey

by Anonymousreply 133April 10, 2024 6:18 PM

Beef or other non-pork chorizo is a North American bastardization of authentic Spanish and Portuguese chorizo. Your link to a strip mall Mexican restaurant website doesn’t change that fact. The end.

by Anonymousreply 134April 10, 2024 7:36 PM

[quote]I spent a weekend at a Hill Coutnry cabin that was furnished with the bed of the Madam.

Eeww, can you imagine how much congealed spooge was on that bed?

by Anonymousreply 135April 10, 2024 9:29 PM

[quote]R134: Beef or other non-pork chorizo is a North American bastardization of authentic Spanish and Portuguese chorizo. Your link to a strip mall Mexican restaurant website doesn’t change that fact. The end.

It's a consensus opinion, your own inflexibility notwithstanding. Just like not everyone is heterosexual, and it's not up to you to insist that those who aren't are somehow less than people. Your argument about chorizo is coming from the same place.

You may 𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑓𝑒𝑟 pork chorizo, but to insist that 𝑎𝑙𝑙 chorizo must be pork is simply not your place to say.

[quote]However, occasionally, other types of meat can be used for making chorizo, such as beef, turkey, deer, or horsemeat.

[quote]Believe it or no, there are even chicken chorizos, sought after for the lean meat content. Last but not least, vegans can also enjoy the taste of the popular sausage - the meat-free soy chorizos.

[quote]Clearly, there are different types of chorizos.

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by Anonymousreply 136April 10, 2024 9:33 PM

When I’m feeling a bit frisky, I’ll put a jalapeño in my grits. That boosts the flavah.

by Anonymousreply 137April 10, 2024 9:48 PM

Pretty sure it had a new mattress R135.

by Anonymousreply 138April 10, 2024 10:39 PM

I specified that I was talking about Mexican chorizo. I did not say it was authentic. One dick has to whine that it isn't Spanish chorizo while another claims no one makes sausage. In the immortal words of Kate Winslet, off you fuck.

by Anonymousreply 139April 10, 2024 10:58 PM

[quote]Pretty sure it had a new mattress [R135].

If mattress sex is the only sex you’ve had, well, bless your heart, at least you tried.

by Anonymousreply 140April 10, 2024 11:01 PM

Fiddle-dee-dee!

Scarlett O'Hara never knew there was such a thing as a Hispanic sausage called chorizo.

Get back to Southern cooking posts, you polecats!

by Anonymousreply 141April 10, 2024 11:13 PM

R139 No. It was only pointed out that your version is a bastardized version. That statement remains factually correct. You exaggerate in an irritating fashion.

by Anonymousreply 142April 10, 2024 11:16 PM

How do traditional southern cooked chicken recipes compare to KFC? Has the Colonel destroyed everyone's palate?

by Anonymousreply 143April 10, 2024 11:22 PM

[quote]R142: No. It was only pointed out that your version is a bastardized version. That statement remains factually correct. You exaggerate in an irritating fashion.

You don't even know with which one of us you were having the discussion.

by Anonymousreply 144April 10, 2024 11:53 PM

R90, you need to order some smoked boudin and chicken cracklings from Ronnie's in Baton Rouge or Hammond, LA. Like, yesterday you should order.

Divine, divine, divine (yeah, yeah, cue the "You mean the I'm dead from Southern food and barking at the Holy Gates-divine" comments).

When my sister is visiting from out of state, she used to load up on Ronnie's smoked boudin to take back for her friends; she had to quit doing it because 90% of the time the boudin wouldn't even make it to the state line.

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by Anonymousreply 145April 11, 2024 12:10 AM

Oh, I forgot to mention @R145 that my sister is a huge clean-eating, 6-days a week bootcamp workout kind of girl. So that smoked boudin and cracklings are a HUGE departure from her normal routine.

by Anonymousreply 146April 11, 2024 12:23 AM

It's Orthodox Lent. Give up DL, R144.

by Anonymousreply 147April 11, 2024 12:23 AM

▲ Non-sequitur to the discussion by someone bearing a personal grudge, using a sock.

by Anonymousreply 148April 11, 2024 12:45 AM

Are oat cakes southern cooking?

by Anonymousreply 149April 11, 2024 12:52 AM

Not that I'm aware.

Isn't that Scottish, R149?

by Anonymousreply 150April 11, 2024 12:56 AM

So is fried chicken.

by Anonymousreply 151April 11, 2024 12:59 AM

It took a moment to click over, but it sounds like R147 thinks I'm Orthodox Christian. Now, that's funny. :D

I'm not a 'Christian' anything. I'm an antitheist - been one for all of this century.

Long ago, I was never Orthodox, or a member of any of the traditional ritualist sectarians.

by Anonymousreply 152April 11, 2024 1:01 AM

Is it, R151?

Isn't fried chicken, Southern-style, another Americanism to which UK schoolchildren are subjected for Youtube laffs?

by Anonymousreply 153April 11, 2024 1:04 AM

Homemade fried chicken is pretty delicious. In Japan, they make something similar called chicken karaage. It's just battered, seasoned pieces of chicken.

by Anonymousreply 154April 11, 2024 2:21 AM

The origins of fried chicken…one POV anyway…

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by Anonymousreply 155April 11, 2024 1:49 PM

Or this better detailed explanation by BBC…

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by Anonymousreply 156April 11, 2024 2:57 PM

R156, the most salient point of that BBC article was this:

[quote]Mariani raised an intriguing possibility, but unfortunately, he didn't offer any proof for his musings.

Granted, both West Africa and Scotland are possible places of 𝑜𝑟𝑖𝑔𝑖𝑛. But it was still the American South which made it what it has become today.

Full disclosure: I've never been able to eat Southern Fried Chicken. My issues with dark meat and meat on the bone are life-long, deep-seated food prejudices. So from an eater's standpoint, I have no dog in this fight. But for white meat boneless options like chicken tenders, breaded nuggets, and canned or shredded chicken carnitas (none of which were locally/commercially available when I was young), I probably wouldn't be eating chicken at all.

by Anonymousreply 157April 11, 2024 4:21 PM

Do you liked deep-fried boneless chicken breast, like you’d get on a burger?

by Anonymousreply 158April 12, 2024 2:12 PM

I used to make a fried chicken recipe handed down by my Afro Cuban grandmother which was the chicken being marinated in dark rum, garlic and lime juice overnight. Then dipped in flour and deep fried in lard. Mine was never as good as hers though.

by Anonymousreply 159April 12, 2024 2:52 PM

That sounds good R159. There is a chicken place near me in the little Hispanic area that seems similar. Delicious.

by Anonymousreply 160April 12, 2024 3:26 PM

Chicharrones del pollo r160. I haven’t made it since I stopped drinking.

by Anonymousreply 161April 12, 2024 3:29 PM

[quote]R158: Do you liked deep-fried boneless chicken breast, like you’d get on a burger?

Sure. Occasionally.

by Anonymousreply 162April 12, 2024 8:03 PM

With KFC, the batter is the main attraction and the chicken is secondary. How to just deep fry batter? Make it thicker?

by Anonymousreply 163April 13, 2024 12:54 PM

You could double dip or triple dip chicken. Or buy the book "More Ways to Get Fat and Unhealthy."

by Anonymousreply 164April 13, 2024 4:23 PM

I can’t stand too much breading on my fried chicken. Gross.🤢

by Anonymousreply 165April 13, 2024 11:16 PM

How many of you wash your chicken?

by Anonymousreply 166April 14, 2024 12:02 AM

R166 no one, hopefully.

by Anonymousreply 167April 14, 2024 2:39 AM

R166, do you mean rinsing the chicken off in cold running water and patting it dry with paper towels? I do that.

by Anonymousreply 168April 14, 2024 7:45 AM

Shrimp and grits with bacon by Sean Brock. This looks good. For my tastes the shrimp might be overcooked, I prefer just cooked seafood.

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by Anonymousreply 169April 14, 2024 5:37 PM

Does the anonymity of DL attract an inordinate quantity of people with anger management issues? I think yes.

Did you read the fucking mission statement, you Family Circle cunt, discussions here are not nice and no one but slimewad hetero cunts want that, fuck you bitch.

by Anonymousreply 170April 15, 2024 4:15 PM

[quote] do you mean rinsing the chicken off in cold running water and patting it dry with paper towels? I do that

I think that makes the potential bacteria spread more. Nowadays they recommend simply drying between paper towels.

by Anonymousreply 171July 7, 2024 10:22 AM

made from offcuts

Why is this? I thought there's a lot of meat and farming in Australia.

by Anonymousreply 172July 7, 2024 4:49 PM

That sausage gravy and biscuit abomination would never grace a proper Southern brunch.

Now grits and grillades are quite welcome indeed.

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by Anonymousreply 173July 7, 2024 4:57 PM

[quote]Why is this? I thought there's a lot of meat and farming in Australia.

Because Australia inherited her sausage recipe from England.

by Anonymousreply 174July 7, 2024 5:16 PM

Ok that looks so good r173

by Anonymousreply 175July 7, 2024 5:32 PM

^^ á la Charles Phoenix: "I k-n-o-o-o-o-w ...."

by Anonymousreply 176July 7, 2024 7:24 PM

I think I'd rather have sausage gravy and biscuits.

by Anonymousreply 177July 9, 2024 4:11 AM

Don’t dip chicken fried steak in egg or it will stick to the pan and tear it off. My dad ruined a few dinners swearing about this until he called his mother for advice.

by Anonymousreply 178July 9, 2024 7:42 AM

[quote]R178: Don’t dip chicken fried steak in egg or it will stick to the pan and tear it off. My dad ruined a few dinners swearing about this until he called his mother for advice.

Sure, if that's the last thing you dip it in. After the egg dip, it's supposed to go back into the seasoned flour mixture. Actually, it's a double dipping process. One tenderizes the meat with a meat hammer, pounding in the seasonings (salt, pepper, maybe a little garlic powder, a few splashes of Tabasco), then dip it in the egg wash, both sides. Then dip it into the seasoned flour, pressing it into it, both sides. Then repeat: back into the egg wash, and back into the flour mixture.

Then it goes into the hot grease. If frying in a pan, the oil needs to be just deep enough to float the steak, so that it need not make sustained direct contact with the bottom of the pan, making it less inclined to stick. Some restaurants deep fry them in a basket (Babe's Chicken comes to mind). Once the grease sears the egg/flour crust, it sets, and is far less likely to adhere to the pan or implements.

by Anonymousreply 179July 9, 2024 10:32 AM
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